7 things to carry in your Project kit

Here are 7 things to keep on your person or nearby that will help you excel as a Project Manager.

1. White Board markers
A magic device that propels a conversation and creates a record acheter viagra en ligne.

2. Wristwatch
Place a wristwatch in front of you so you can keep your eye on the time so that the important items get covered and you end meetings on schedule.

Integration Professionals Project Kit
Integration Professionals Project Kit

3. 2 kinds of Pain reliever – ASA and Ibuprofin
Make a drawer in your desk available for your project team with necessities. Learned this one from a wedding planner. Could also include stain remover, candies, taxi chits.

4. Project contact list with email, phone, and mobile contacts
Missing a team member?, late for a meeting?, need urgent help from an executive? – always carry a printout of your contact list with email and phone info.

5. Project Issue / Risk log , Schedule, Change Log, and Budget Summary
Some people like to carry around a complete Project binder. I’ve boiled it down to a few key items that I update periodically – the purpose to have written notes to be able to give unplanned “hallway” updates if you bump into an important stakeholder.

6. Post-it notes and Black Sharpie markers
See number one above and add steroids. Get all meeting participants working on a plan, issue, or risk concurrently, if appropriate. Keep one idea per note. Print in large block letters. Post on wall and re-arrange to suit. Use a camera phone to snap the results.

7. Coffee-cards for instant recognition
Giving out $5 coffee cards just to recognize folks for attending a meeting smacks of desperation – but it is still appreciated.

What items should be added to the list? Add your ideas by replying below.

 

Stephen Wise

http://www.IntegrationProfessionals.com/

The most powerful leadership skill an expert Project Manager needs for success

No one can be an expert in all fields. A Project Manager is a skilled expert on leading teams to initiate, plan, execute and close projects. These are among the most important skills, but not the most powerful.

If you aren’t feeling well you go to see your General Practitioner (GP). Your GP understands the big picture and upon identifying a specific issue or risk with your health may refer you to a specialist. In this analogy the GP is like a Project Manager – they do not need to be an expert in every field and one difference between okay GP’s and excellent GP’s is the speed and quality and follow-up related to the referral.

All Project Managers will tell you that the most commonly used skill on a project is communication. However, neither communication nor planning are the most powerful skills in the arsenal. The true multiplier, the most powerful skill, is the ability to learn from others.

The ability to learn from others enables the PM to absorb the nuances of the culture, mitigate the hidden risks of the processes, and allow for the complexity of the technology. When a diverse project team gets together it doesn’t matter who is the smartest or most senior in the room. What matters is learning from everyone’s skills and experience and channeling that back to the team so the whole is greater than the sum. The most powerful leadership skill is the ability to apply the greater whole in order to reach the objectives of the project quicker and with less risk of failure.